Tag Archives: war

Disliking (Hating) Atheists and other Pestilences

One of the conundrums of religion is the sad but real fact that many people of faith have little tolerance for those without faith. In other words, there appears to be a lot of hate going around. Why does this happen? It is my view that any form of atheism and agnosticism are perceived as a threat to the religious. After all, if one believes they are strong in their faith and a question about their faith appears unanswerable, who wouldn’t begin to wonder and speculate about the foundations of their faith? It happens to everyone. At this point the only thing left to do for a person without an answer is to resort to “faith” as faith gets by with little or no logical formation for it to exist. While this debate could be productive it is stopped cold in its tracks when arguing from logic or supposition. The subsequent “disliking” of faithless non-believers usually takes the form of distancing one’s self from the logician. If you remain distant from the cause of discomfort then discomfort does not have to consciously exist nor do inconvenient reminders of one’s irrational faith and logic. All one needs to do is stay away from its cause. In the short term this works but in the longer view one must take ever stronger and stronger measures to counteract the possibility that logical thoughts of others are the cause of many fears and anxieties.

There are a number of tools we have at our disposal to manage the questions and subsequent anxiety about religion. We could talk it out, try to understand it, we could rationalize it to ourselves, ignore it, pretend it doesn’t exist, run away from it, and get angry. Anger, minimizing, ignoring and exclusion appear to be the most frequently used tools to deal with what is not acceptable thinking or questioning about one’s faith. That is why there is so much religious hostility in the world. Too often the mantra of those with clear-cut but unprovable religious mandates espouse something like the following statement: “If you don’t believe as I do, I will (kill, hurt, ostracize, label, etc. [fill in the blank]) you!” Nations often take up arms against each other because of one’s beliefs. These nations are often driven by religious ideations and are no different than an individual. Taking up word weaponry to prove one is wrong or to hurt another is not uncommon. Most war efforts are driven by fear and/or anger. In order for one to avoid confrontation or lose a word war we resort to hostile statements while ostracizing the offender. The result is rage, intolerance and isolation. The tendency to isolate one who thinks differently than we do is born of a lack of understanding of both one’s own views and that of others. Of course this works both ways.

The irony in all of this is that many religious types claim to be concerned about the behaviors and thinking of those whose views run contrary to theirs. Yet, when pushed to understand that of another an impenetrable wall arises and communication is severely thrashed. This is an unfortunate result of closed minds, minds that will not consider the views of another when a position runs contrary to theirs. The need to perpetuate their thinking brings a kind of comfort outlasting that of logic. A place of disgrace lingers in the background as a person of faith will surely find themselves placed should they ask the wrong questions or betray their growing lack of faith in their religious culture.

Integrity is at the heart of most religions and expressions of faith. Therefore, it seems only right that a person of faith who is seeking to be a person of integrity would be willing to open up their faith questions and those of others with an approach that questions with honesty, fairness and reasonableness and not hostility, isolation, shunning and ridicule.


Denying My Christian Faith So I Can “Carry” and Go to War

One of the most perplexing issues to me as an observer of those who call themselves “Christian” is the rationalizations put forward by the “washed” to carry, conceal and make war (not necessarily defensive but preemptive or aggressive war). I am also confused by the attitude that would take down or frustrate those who think, look or act differently than themselves, such as Muslims, Gays and atheists. How is this kind of thought and behavior process Christian? Blindly following one’s own desires at the expense of true discipleship seems to me far too common among those who would call themselves followers of Christ. I see it as hypocritical and worthy of damnation.

Where are the true believers, the one’s who are consistent with their faith and platform? Where are the lovers of men and women who reach out without agenda to those who pose a religious and philosophical difference to their own? And, who are those who set themselves up as authorities regarding the truth, who argue passionately and arrogantly that they know anyone else’s religion is specious when compared to theirs? I am appalled and angered by the lack of compassion for those who see, hear, feel and think about religion, politics and living one’s life different than the professed masses of Jesus followers. This kind of prejudicial and convenient/inconvenient thinking has to stop or we will be at each other’s throats until we are no more, or is that what Christians want?


From Tomorrow Can We Borrow?

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A song about a 1963 kind of hope… I’ve left the text set up for recording.

1963 HOPE: From Tomorrow Can We Borrow?

 4/4 135

Intro:  ∞Am           ∞=riff, |=break

Am                 F                                          Am

1. A bullet from a gun, laid out a man named Jack.

F                                           Am

Blood smeared on a dress, soft tissue made a place.

E7                       F       |                                   ∞Am

Jack’s body grew cold, Our nation mourned his soul.

Am                  F                                  Am

2. Boots reversed, sorrow leading Black Jack,

F                          Am

Veiled lady dressed in black, a nation’s long night.

E7                                F       |                          ∞Am

Two children wonder where? Their father isn’t there.

C ✓                      G                         F                  Am

Cho.: So can we borrow from tomorrow? When this madness is past?

E7                                F           |                                  ∞   Am

We’ve had too much of sorrow. From tomorrow can we borrow?

Bridge: E7-F-C-E7-Am

Am                           F                                                    Am

3. Years have left us weary, family, friends, preparing graves.

F                                              Am

Viet Cong to Taliban, we’ve spent our nation’s face.

(Viet Nam/Afghanistan)

E7                                         F       |                                      ∞Am

Will there come a time for easing? Will there come a time for peace?

Cho: (Repeat as above and fade)

© 2012, Ed Anderson